Blog

Tips to Help Understand and Avoid Tax Scams

You’ve just received a notice from the IRS.  It indicates that, after multiple attempts to get in touch with you, they are going to levy you. You start to panic; you don’t remember the IRS ever attempting to reach out to you.  Maybe you’ve never even owed a tax liability. After calling the number on the notice, the agent on the line tells you to pay up – or face the consequences. Afraid that the IRS will levy your bank account – and possibly seize your house – you provide your payment information over the phone. You check your bank account and your entire savings are gone. You contact the number again, but the line has been disconnected. When you do get in touch with a real IRS Agent, they tell you that you never owed a balance with them in the first place.  You were just scammed.

Millions of Americans will receive communication from scammers impersonating the IRS, using scare tactics to get people to fork over their hard earned money.  These scammers will attempt to take your money by calling your personal phone, sending malicious emails, and sending fake letters like the one in the example above.  Below we will break down these different forms of communication and the different tactics they will take to gain your trust and steal your money.

One of the most common forms of tax scams is by leaving automated voicemails on your personal phone that tell you the IRS will be collecting on owed taxes or that there is a warrant for your arrest. In some cases, they will even mirror their number to make it appear similar to an actual IRS number. These fraudsters will most likely ask for cash payments sent to a temporary address or try to get you to tell them your social security number. Some may even ask for your bank account number directly in an attempt to bleed your account dry.

Sending false emails is a tactic known as “phishing.” When people click on a link in these emails, it uploads a virus that steals your sensitive information, allowing them access to your passwords, and even your bank accounts and credit cards.

Fake IRS notices are sent in an attempt to have you call the number listed on the letter.  Once they have you on the line, they bully you just so they can gain access to your personal information. The letter itself may look like it was directly sent to you by an assigned revenue officer from the IRS, and it can be difficult to tell the difference.

There are ways to protect yourself from scammers. It is important to know that the IRS will never ask for your bank account or card information over the phone, nor will they ever demand you to pay back your supposed balance immediately without first providing you with balance due notices in the mail. The IRS will also never ask you for your payment in one specific or unusual way, such as with gift cards or prepaid cards.  In addition, if the IRS is claiming that there are discrepancies on your tax return and you feel as though their claim is wrong, the IRS will allow you to provide proof your tax return is accurate. Finally, the IRS will never call you and tell you that they are going to have you arrested or sued for not paying your tax liability back to them.

It is important to always verify where the source of notices, phone calls or emails you receive are coming from. Owing the IRS can be frightening, but what’s even scarier is knowing that there are scammers preying on taxpayers, trying to steal from them. Always be cautious and aware of your tax situation and be sure to verify who you’re speaking with and where your money is going. You can contact the IRS directly at 1-800-829-1040 or you can go directly onto the IRS’s website to learn more about preventative measures to take to ensure you won’t get scammed.

How IRS Debt Can Ruin Your Travel Plans (and Jeopardize Your Passport)

The stress of owing the IRS can be overwhelming. The ever-present threat of having a lien placed on your assets, the fear every time you check your bank account to discover it has been levied dry, the strain of having the IRS garnish your monthly wages; these are just a few of the things that millions of Americans go through every day. Now, the IRS has made further changes to crack down on Americans who have not paid their taxes.

As of February 2018, Americans who owe the IRS more than $50,000 are at risk of having their passports revoked. If you have unpaid taxes owed to the IRS, it is important to either pay your balance in full or go on a monthly installment agreement in order to avoid having these travel restrictions placed on you. The State Department is now working alongside the IRS to not only revoke existing passports but to also deny any passport application for those with seriously delinquent tax debt.  (If you are overseas and your passport is denied, the State may issue a temporary passport that has limited validity to return to the United States.)  Essentially, until the tax debt is settled with the IRS, people will be placed on this new “No Passport” list.

There are a few exceptions to be aware of.  You won’t be at risk of being placed on the “No Passport” list if you are currently going through bankruptcy, if the IRS acknowledges you have been the victim of identity theft, or if there is a natural disaster declared on a federal level.  You may also be able to keep or renew your passport if you have a request pending for an installment agreement, have a pending offer in compromise with the IRS or if the IRS has accepted an adjustment that will satisfy your debt. And if you are placed on the “No Passport” list, the IRS will hold your application for 90 days to allow you to resolve your tax liability, pay your balance in full or enter into an installment agreement before revoking your passport.

This is yet another sign that the IRS is escalating their collection efforts against Americans who have unpaid taxes and another reason for you, as a taxpayer,  to stay current and compliant with their IRS filings.  If you are in the unfortunate situation of having delinquent IRS debt, it is wise to speak to a qualified tax professional who can help you evaluate your options sooner rather than later. Because when it comes to owing money to the IRS, delaying is almost always a losing strategy. For more information regarding on the IRS passport revocation and denial policy, click here!

Tax Tips for Uber Drivers and those Working in the Gig Economy

So you just joined Uber. Now you have a little extra cash, and you’re the one picking up the tab at dinner when you go out with friends and family. There couldn’t possibly be a downside to earning this additional income, right? Well, while there isn’t necessarily a drawback to having more money in your pocket, there are a few factors to being an Uber driver that you should consider from a tax standpoint. Here are some common questions and tax tips that first time Uber drivers should think about before getting started.

What is the difference between a 1099 earner versus a W2 earner?
If you have taxes being deducted out of every paycheck, you are most likely a W2 earner. At the end of the year, a W2 earner will receive a form that will state their annual wages along with a breakdown of the taxes that were withheld throughout the year.

A 1099 earner, however, does not have any taxes withheld from their income. The total amount of pay you received from Uber (or any other person or entity for whom you were a 1099 earner) during the year will be reported on a 1099 form. It is the responsibility of the 1099 earner to either make estimated tax payments (more on this below) or pay any balance in full at the end of the tax year.

What are estimated tax payments and can they help me avoid owing at the end of the year?
Estimated tax payments, or ETPs, are based on the amount of income that you expect to have earned in the current tax year. ETPs are usually made if a taxpayer believes that they will have a tax balance at the end of the year. A taxpayer may also wish to make ETPs if they are not withholding enough taxes from their paycheck, or if taxes are not being deducted from their income at all. A 1099 earner (or even a W2 earner who does not have enough withholdings listed) has the choice to pay their estimated tax payments bi-weekly, monthly or even quarterly. ETPs must be made in order to avoid owing at the end of the year, and it is even possible to receive a penalty if ETPs are not being made. The IRS allows you to make your estimated tax payments by either mailing a payment in, paying over the phone, or even paying online.

What are tax write-offs and how do I keep track of all my business expenses?
Being that you are a 1099 earner for Uber, it’s a little like running your own business. And just like if you were running your own business, you must document and report any income you have received and expenses you have made. Many of these expenses are tax write-offs. Some expenses that you may experience as an Uber driver include car maintenance, gas, and mileage. You will need to keep proof of your expenses throughout the tax year in order to write them off with the IRS. In order to do this accurately, you will need to keep track of how much of your mileage is used for business and how much is used for your personal life. There are multiple downloadable apps on the market designed to keep track of this for you. If you forgot to do this, don’t worry – you can request this information directly from Uber. Once you know what percentage of your mileage is used for business, you can calculate what percentage of your gas and maintenance can be listed as a tax write-off. Don’t forget to save those receipts; you will need them in case you are ever audited by the IRS!

Whether you’re using Uber to pay the bills or to give you a little extra income on the side, paying your taxes doesn’t have to be scary. Following the steps above and stashing away a little bit of your income can help ensure you don’t get blindsided come tax season. Now get out there and have some fun with your extra cash and remember, drive safe!

Medical Identity Fraud – A Risk to Your Health and Wealth

Imagine this scenario: you’re sitting in a doctor’s office with a long-lasting fever after your camping trip. Because it may be an infection from a tick bite, the doctor decides to give you an antibiotic shot. She glances at your records, swabs your arm with alcohol, picks up the syringe and says “this little dose of penicillin should help…” and you interrupt: “wait, I’m allergic to penicillin.” “But, that’s not what your records say… we gave you penicillin last time you were here.”

Frightening? Yes. Impossible? Not at all.

Medical identity theft is on the rise and it can not only have crippling effects on your finances but can seriously put your health in jeopardy.

The Medical Identity Fraud Alliance, a group of concerned corporate and non-profit partners,  speculate that over 2 million Americans were put at risk of medical identity theft in 2014, a figure that leaped 22% from previous research. This doesn’t even take into account the nearly 80 million individuals affected by the Anthem data breach in 2015 – the country’s largest healthcare breach.

Identity thieves steal personal health information (PHI) such as social security numbers and medical insurance identification numbers for two main reasons:

  • For financial gain by filing fraudulent claims to your health insurer (including Medicaid/Medicare) in order to receive a reimbursement check
  • Free medical care of high cost or elective procedures or to secure prescription medication – specifically narcotics that can be abused or sold on the black market

Financial fraud such as a stolen credit card can be frustrating, but can be quickly resolved since it’s easier to detect, and often doesn’t have significant long-term financial impacts. Medical identity fraud, on the other hand can cost a victim $13,500 on average and be notoriously difficult to resolve.

Because of advancement in electronic communication and collaboration in the healthcare industry, PHI is more exposed and accessible. At the same time, this doesn’t always mean that your health provider is on the same page with your insurer. PHI is rarely tracked across multiple networks and this gap can make stealing and using it feasible.

Here are a few things you can do to minimize your risk of medical identity fraud:

  • Carefully read all correspondence from your medical provider and Health Insurance Company. Treat each line item like you might for a bank statement and ensure that each charge or claim is valid.
  • Safeguard your Social Security number and healthcare data. Make sure that when you provide it, it’s absolutely necessary. It’s always okay to ask.
  • Avoid putting medical procedures and hospital stays on social media. You never know who’s looking and this piece of data could be the last one that the thief needs to commit their crime.

Our identity protection program provides comprehensive, proactive monitoring for several data points, including your medical information. To learn more about how we can help you minimize your risk of medical identity theft, visit https://optimatax.idprotectiononline.com/enrollment/.

 

Deducting Your Gambling Income & Losses

We all know the thrill of winning from gambling whether you’re an avid gambler or the occasional one. But did you know that all winnings are fully taxable? No matter how small your winnings, they must be reported on your tax return. Gambling income includes but not limited to winnings from lotteries, keno, slot machines, table games (i.e. poker, craps, roulette, blackjack, etc.), racing or sports betting, and bingo.

Here’s where the deductions on your gambling losses come in – you may be entitled to a deduction if you had any gambling losses come tax filing season, but only up to the extent of your winnings for the year. For example, if you won $3,000 from gambling for 2016, the most you can deduct on your 2016 tax return is $3,000, no matter how much you lost. Losses must be reported on Schedule A as an Itemized Deduction, which are separate from winnings. Continue reading for important facts about claiming your gambling losses on your tax return.

Here are 5 important facts about deducting gambling income and losses:

  • You must report the full amount or your winnings as income and claim your losses (up to the amount of your winnings) as an itemized deduction.
  • You cannot reduce your gambling winnings by your gambling losses and then report the difference.
  • Claim your gambling losses on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions, under ‘Other Miscellaneous Deductions’.
  • The IRS recommends that you keep a written documentation, like a notebook or a diary, for proof in case of an audit and to keep winnings and losses separate and organized. According to the IRS Publication 529 Miscellaneous Deductions, your notebook should contain at least the following:
    • The date and type of your specific wager or wagering activity.
    • The name and address or location of the gambling establishment.
    • The names of other persons present with you at the gambling establishment.
    • The amount(s) you won or lost.
  • According to the IRS, you should also have other documentation for additional proof through the following:
    • Form W-2G (if given), certain winnings; Form 5754, statement by person(s) receiving gambling winnings; wagering tickets; cancelled checks; substitute checks; credit records; bank withdrawals; and statements of actual winnings or payment slips provided to you by the gambling establishment.

To keep up to date with gambling tax laws and your responsibilities as a taxpayer, please refer to the IRS Help & Resource page or consult your local CPA or tax attorney.

Child Identity Theft

Parents do their best to keep their children safe. They advise them to wear a helmet when biking, avoid talking to strangers, and look both ways before crossing the street. But there’s one type of danger that’s hard to avoid. A recent study indicated that up to 10% of America’s youth have potentially been targets of identity theft.

The large majority of children under the age of 18 have blank credit profiles which make them uniquely valuable to identity thieves. There’s no credit profile established, children’s social security numbers can be paired with any name to buy cars, apply for loans, open credit cards, or procure driver’s licenses.

What makes child identity theft particularly troubling is that it can go unnoticed for several years leaving a complete financial disaster for the child when they turn 18 and begin applying for student loans, credit cards, mobile phones, or an apartment. If the incident occurred years in the past, it can be virtually impossible to track down the criminal.

How does this happen? Even more so than adults, children’s Social Security Numbers (SSN) are used frequently as a form of identification at schools, doctor’s offices, and any number of extracurricular activities. If a child’s SSN is easily accessible in a written file or on an unprotected computer network, it could be targeted by identity thieves. Additionally, credit bureaus do not have checks in place to verify the age on credit applications. An individual’s credit profile begins when the first application is received. If the application says 26, then the credit bureaus will assume that’s true.

While it’s impossible to absolutely prevent identity theft, there are a number of steps that can be taken to reduce your child’s risk:

  • If your child’s Social Security Number is being requested, it’s always okay to ask why it’s needed and if it’s completely neccessary. In most cases, an alternative identification number can be created.
  • don’t carry your child’s Social Security card with you. If your wallet or purse is ever lost of stolen, this could cause some big problems for you both in the future.
  • Shred or destroy any documents with your child’s SSN, such as medical or school records. If they need to be retained, make sure they are kept in a secure location.
  • Talk to your kids about the importqance of identity security. Let them know that they should never share their phone number, address, or SSN with anyone unless there’s a parent present.
  • Keep an eye out for suspicious activity. If credit card offers are arriving at your house with your child’s name on them, it’s a good sign that something isn’t right.
  • Once a year, ensure that your child’s credit is untouched by attempting to pull a credit report from any number of free credit report sites. If your child’s credit is secure, the credit bureau will not be able to provide a report. If you do request a credit report and one is returned, you should take immediate action.

One of the best ways to protect your child’s identity is to enroll them in our family identity protection program. You can monitor your child’s date from your own dashboard and receive an alert if any suspicious activity takes place by enrolling in Optima’s Family Protection Plan at https://optimatax.idprotectiononline.com/enrollment/.

 

 

Summer Travel Plans? Stay Protected From Identity Theft

 

The warm weather is finally here and with it comes the busy travel season that so many people have excitedly been anticipating. Some have been planning for months in advance, booking flights abroad and hoping to fit as many countries as they can into their itineraries.

Be cautious of being a target for identity thieves before you start to head out on your summer adventure. Travelers are an extremely attractive target for identity thieves, especially if you’re traveling to a place you’ve never ventured to before. Any locals – or scammers! – can probably pick up on this. Many travelers also rely on public Wi-Fi to look things up pertaining to their trip. Add to this the fact that you are likely carrying around more documentation than usual, and you’ve got all the makings for a sizable bull’s eye on their back.

An American Express Spending & Saving Tracker revealed that 8 in 10 Americans have summer travel plans, with 72% of these planning stateside escapes and 15% traveling overseas. No matter how you dice it, there’s going to be a lot of movement in the skies and on the roads in the coming summer months.

With millions of people packing their bags and leaving their homes for adventures, retreats and getaways, there will surely be an uptick in opportunities for identity thieves this summer. Experian’s Summer Travel and Budget survey showed that identity theft personally affects nearly one in ten travelers and that one in five people have had sensitive information lost or stolen while traveling.

Below are quick identity protection tips for each stage of your summer travels and adventures:

 BEFORE YOU GO:

  • Check for any travel warnings or alerts for your destination country. The Department of State provides the latest security messages. It’s always best to be in the know about any crime – such as pick pocketing – happening in your destination country so that you can be as vigilant as possible.
  • Put only your last name and phone number on your luggage tags. Your full name and address are one too many personal details if put in the wrong hands.
  • Notify your bank and credit card companies of your travel plans. Many such companies now place freezes on accounts when they see suspicious activity like out-of-country use as a means to prevent fraud – it’s easy to avoid this inconvenience!
  • Don’t post any vacation plans on social media. It’s okay to be excited about your trip, but you don’t need to publicize it. You never know who could be lurking behind a computer screen happy to learn that your house will be unattended for a period of time.
  • Put a hold on your mail while you’re gone. An overflowing mailbox is a jackpot for an identity thief. It not only signifies that you’re away, but thieves can then steal the pieces that contain your personally identifiable information (PII).
  • Clean out your wallet and/or purse before leaving. Remove any receipts and expired cards, along with anything else you don’t absolutely need to be carrying with you. Keep only the credit and debit cards you know you will need to use while traveling. Less is more!

WHILE TRAVELING:

  • Limit your use of public Wi-Fi as much as possible. While these networks are incredibly convenient, they are very often unsecured. This means that any information you input while connected to the hotspot could be viewed by someone else. Never access your financial account or any other sites that require a password when using public Wi-Fi.
  • Use cash when possible and credit cards over debit cards. Travelers are often warned of the dangers of carrying around large amounts of cash. However, depending on where you are traveling, some merchants still practice questionable transaction processes – making cash a safer method of payment. In most cases though, using a credit card is considered safe. Furthermore, it’s almost always recommended to use the credit option of your card versus the debit option. If your card numbers ever get into the wrong hands, most credit card companies will quickly reverse or cover fraudulent charges, while recovering funds from your drained bank account can be more complicated.
  • Be cautious when using ATMs. Inspect the machine carefully before inserting your card. Fraudsters can attach card skimmers to the slot that capture your information when you insert it; very often, these look like they are part of the machine. Also, always shield the keypad when entering your PIN – scammers can also set up hidden video recorders. The safest ATMs to use are attached to banks in well-lit areas.
  • Lock up valuables and personal documents at the hotel. This includes boarding passes, confirmation emails, passports, and jewelry. Even hotel staff have been known to go through rooms while they are cleaning and steal items. Everything is much more secure in a safe!
  • Keep your phone password-protected. If you’re not the type of person to keep a password guard on your phone, make an exception while traveling. If your phone is ever lost or stolen, an identity thief could easily access banking apps and social media accounts.

WHEN YOU RETURN:

  • Check your credit card and bank statements often for any fraudulent activity. It’s best to catch fraud as early as possible so that you can take action immediately. This minimizes damage and makes resolution that much easier.
  • Check your credit report throughout the year. Federal law requires the three major credit bureaus to provide you with a free credit report once a year. You can stagger these free reports every four months from each bureau so that you’re seeing your report somewhat regularly. Make sure you recognize everything that’s on there – if anything doesn’t ring a bell, look into it!
  • Change your PINs and passwords after a trip. This is especially important if you logged into any accounts while on the road or accessed an ATM. Traveling can open you up to all kinds of vulnerabilities; don’t take the risk with your PINs and passwords.
  • Make sure you properly dispose all trip confirmation emails and boarding passes. This means shredding them before tossing them into the recycling bin. These types of documents contain more information than most people think. Barcodes on boarding passes can actually contain your frequent flyer information, and other such documents reveal itineraries and other personally identifiable information that identity thieves would be happy to misuse.
  • Lastly, now is the time to post about your adventure on social media. Now that you’ve returned, you can share all those stunning snaps you shot. We really do want to hear about how much you enjoyed your vacation!

Of course, nothing compares to the peace of mind you will receive from Optima’s ID Protection Plan, which includes services like suspicious activity alerts and identity monitoring that will provide you with an extra boost of confidence when you return from a trip. Most importantly, if you do fall victim to identity theft, our 24/7 Identity Theft Resolution Service Team will work to restore your identity and prevent further damage.

Learn more and enroll in Optima’s ID Protection Plan at https://optimatax.idprotectiononline.com/enrollment/.

Tax Tips: Your Child’s Summer Camp And Daycare Expense Tax Credit

Summer is right around the corner – the wonderful season of good ol’ sunshine and time for relaxing. School is out for summer vacation and with it comes a whirlwind of family activities and the seasonal tradition of sending your kids off to summer camp. And if you’re a working parent who depends on summer day camp and and daycare, you know summer also means dishing out some extra expenses.

Fortunately, you may have a break. Some of the added expenses may help you qualify for tax deductions and credits that can save you some money next tax season. Here are nine facts you need to know for claiming summer camp and daycare expenses, also known as the Child and Depended Care Credit:

  • Earned income. To qualify, you (and your spouse if filing jointly) must have earned income during the year.
  • Expenses must be work-related. Essentially, this means you’re paying for the camp or daycare for the qualifying child so you can work, or look for work.
  • Correct tax forms. To be able to claim this credit, you must file a Form 1040, 1040A, or Form 1040NR; you cannot claim the credit on Forms 1040EZ or 1040NR-EZ.
  • Age of your qualifying child or dependent. Qualifying child must be under the age of 13 and must be your dependent when care was provided.
  • Some qualifying care restrictions. Expenses for overnight camps or schooling/tutoring costs do not qualify – it is not considered a work-related expense for purposes of the credit. You also cannot claim the credit if you paid for someone else’s child or if someone else paid for your child.
  • Specialized summer camps. Camps that specialize in a particular activity, such as sport camps, math camps, or even art camps can qualify for the credit. Keep in mind expenses that go towards required, but personal items for the camp such as sports equipment, clothing, art supplies or even a laptop don’t qualify – they are still considered personal accessories.
  • Health-related expenses. The costs of “preparing” for the camp or daycare, such as required vaccinations or wellness exams are deductible if you itemize on Schedule A and if the total medical expenses during the year exceed 10% of your AGI, or adjusted gross income.
  • Qualifying childcare provider restriction. Your childcare provider cannot be your spouse, dependent, or the child’s parent.
  • “Are we there yet?” The costs to take your child to and from the daycare or camp location in your own transportation doesn’t qualify as an expense for purposes of the credit; however, if there are transportation fees associated with or included in the camp or daycare during operating hours, the costs may qualify as an expense.

The purpose of this tax break is to financially assists working parents and guardians involved with raising children (or caring for a disabled dependent). The tax credit can be up to 35 percent of your allowable expenses, depending on your income. The total expense limit is $3,000 for one qualifying child or $6,000 for two or more qualifying children.

Of course, we all know the tax code is very long and complex, so other exceptions and restrictions may apply. You can check out the IRS publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses for full details about this tax credit on their website.

Identity Safety And Staying Secure With Wearable Devices


The increasingly connected world brings new conveniences that greatly benefit our everyday lives. No new connected device seems more ubiquitous than wearable devices – nearly 33 million were in use in the U.S. in 2015 by an estimated 20 million people. Smartwatches like Pebble and Apple watch allow us to access the internet with a flick of a wrist. Wearable health tech like the Fitbit and the gadget-class favorite Jawbone help improve the livelihoods of millions.

As much as wearables bring value to our lives, they also create a new opportunity for criminals to extract personally identifiable information. Like many other new technologies, security vulnerabilities in wearables are being exposed and potentially exploited.

The more information that’s collected, the easier it is to identify account numbers and passwords as well as medical ID numbers and tax return data. Better understanding the individual’s routines and habits ensures that criminal activity will go unnoticed for longer periods of time.

But some wearable data can provide quicker wins for identity thieves:

Most wearable devices use an accelerometer and gyroscope to track forward motion and directional orientation. Some even contain an altimeter to measure altitude for hikers and climbers. All of this data is crunched into code that orients the user’s specific location and tracks their activity – sometimes down to a few inches. Shockingly, new research found that ATM PIN codes could be discerned from the data in wearables’ sensors with 80% accuracy on one try and 90% accuracy after three tries.

A flash survey conducted by corporate identity management firm Centrify exposed some worrying trends:

  • 69% of wearable device owners don’t utilize login credentials such as passwords, fingerprint scans, or voice recognition to access their device, and
  • 56% of wearable owners use their device to access corporate applications such as Outlook, Dropbox, and Salesforce.
  • While the sample size was small, the survey was conducted at the RSA Conference, one of the world’s largest gatherings of information security professionals. If those on the frontline of data security leave their personal and corporate data at risk, it’s easy to imagine that the population at large may be even less cautious – jeopardizing their identities and your corporate data security.

Staying Secure With Wearable Devices

While wearables (and all technology, for that matter) are never 100% secure, there are a number of tactics that can be undertaken to minimize the risk of data theft:

  • Opt-out of automatic data transmission that will continually upload information via Wi-Fi or other networks.
  • When using a Wi-Fi, stick to known and/or secure networks.
  • Enable passwords and change them regularly. If available, use two-step authentication.
  • Physically secure the device if it’s not in use. Particularly, when traveling, utilize hotel safes.
  • Take time to learn how to remotely erase data so that the device can be “cleaned” if it’s lost or stolen.
  • Make sure to regularly update the operating system in order to patch known security gaps.

Looking for ways to minimize your risk of identity theft? Maintain a peace of mind while using your wearable device by enrolling in Optima’s ID Protection Plan at optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.

Spring Cleaning For a Secure Identity

photo_500

Spring is in full swing with its longer and sunnier days, and for many people, it is time for the annual spring cleaning to disentangle their homes from the build-up of wintertime clutter. However, much of that “clutter” can be pure gold for an identity thief. Junk mail such as credit card offers and unsolicited loan pre-approvals are chock full of valuable information about finances and lifestyle. Virtual clutter is also a target – unsecured and unorganized computer and smart phone data can be mined.

Minimize identity theft risk this spring with these easy tips:

  • Paperwork. Decide which documents need to be saved and then file them in a secure location. Unwanted items that contain personal information should be shredded, including receipts, bank and credit card statements, credit card offers, medical records, and health insurance statements.
  • Computers. Organize personal information and documents into password-protected folders. When deleting old or unneeded files, make sure to regularly empty the computer’s recycle bin. Ensure that all anti-virus software is up-to-date and run a full scan to ensure that the computer is free of viruses and malicious software.
  • Smartphone. Enable the phone’s password-protection features and only use secure networks, especially when using online banking or other apps that transmit sensitive information. When upgrading to a new device, wipe the old phone’s memory and restore to factory settings.
  • Wallet and Purses. Shred old receipts and outdated credit cards. Remove everything that isn’t necessary on a day-to-day basis – especially a Social Security card.

This spring, you can make sure you’re keeping your identity as clean and secure as possible by enrolling in Optima’s ID Protection Plan at optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.