September 11, 2017

Imagine this scenario: you’re sitting in a doctor’s office with a long-lasting fever after your camping trip. Because it may be an infection from a tick bite, the doctor decides to give you an antibiotic shot. She glances at your records, swabs your arm with alcohol, picks up the syringe and says “this little dose of penicillin should help…” and you interrupt: “wait, I’m allergic to penicillin.” “But, that’s not what your records say… we gave you penicillin last time you were here.”

Frightening? Yes. Impossible? Not at all.

Medical identity theft is on the rise and it can not only have crippling effects on your finances but can seriously put your health in jeopardy.

The Medical Identity Fraud Alliance, a group of concerned corporate and non-profit partners,  speculate that over 2 million Americans were put at risk of medical identity theft in 2014, a figure that leaped 22% from previous research. This doesn’t even take into account the nearly 80 million individuals affected by the Anthem data breach in 2015 – the country’s largest healthcare breach.

Identity thieves steal personal health information (PHI) such as social security numbers and medical insurance identification numbers for two main reasons:

  • For financial gain by filing fraudulent claims to your health insurer (including Medicaid/Medicare) in order to receive a reimbursement check
  • Free medical care of high cost or elective procedures or to secure prescription medication – specifically narcotics that can be abused or sold on the black market

Financial fraud such as a stolen credit card can be frustrating, but can be quickly resolved since it’s easier to detect, and often doesn’t have significant long-term financial impacts. Medical identity fraud, on the other hand can cost a victim $13,500 on average and be notoriously difficult to resolve.

Because of advancement in electronic communication and collaboration in the healthcare industry, PHI is more exposed and accessible. At the same time, this doesn’t always mean that your health provider is on the same page with your insurer. PHI is rarely tracked across multiple networks and this gap can make stealing and using it feasible.

Here are a few things you can do to minimize your risk of medical identity fraud:

  • Carefully read all correspondence from your medical provider and Health Insurance Company. Treat each line item like you might for a bank statement and ensure that each charge or claim is valid.
  • Safeguard your Social Security number and healthcare data. Make sure that when you provide it, it’s absolutely necessary. It’s always okay to ask.
  • Avoid putting medical procedures and hospital stays on social media. You never know who’s looking and this piece of data could be the last one that the thief needs to commit their crime.

Our identity protection program provides comprehensive, proactive monitoring for several data points, including your medical information. To learn more about how we can help you minimize your risk of medical identity theft, visit https://optimatax.idprotectiononline.com/enrollment/.