December 18, 2013

It’s better to give than to receive, except when it comes to taxes.

Fortunately, the holiday season provides the perfect opportunity to give more to those you care about and less to greedy Uncle Sam. Here are a few options for tax-deductible gifts.

Build a Child’s College Fund

A great gift that fits the bill is a contribution to a 529 plan. These plans allow a child’s college fund to grow tax free, and reduce state income taxes for contributors across the country.

Under federal law, individuals can contribute up to $14,000 a year to a 529 plan, and married couples can give as much as $28,000 a year. When their child is ready for college, parents can withdraw money from the plan and pay no taxes on it. They just have to be sure to use the money for tuition and other expenses required to attend college.

Parents and grandparents are the ones who most often contribute to the plans, and they can receive multiple tax breaks. Working parents are able to avoid paying a federal gift tax and in many states, can deduct the contribution from their state income tax. Retired grandparents can reduce the estate tax their children will have to pay.

There is even the opportunity for married parents or grandparents to contribute a lump sum of $140,000 for the next five years. This lump sum option can generate a much larger return on investment. But it could also leave money on the table if the IRS increases the maximum allowable contribution during the next five years.

Send Gifts to your Business Contacts

Parents and grandparents, though, aren’t the only ones who can benefit from giving money during the holidays. The federal government allows individuals to deduct as much as $25 per gift to business associates and customers during the holidays. That means if you want to give to those who have helped you at your job this year, feel free. And you will also receive something special: a reduction in income taxes. Just remember that the maximum deduction is $25 per recipient each year, so if you sent someone a $25 business gift earlier in the year, you won’t be able to deduct your holiday gift to them.

Donate to Charity

Making a donation to charity, whether it’s giving a bag of old clothes or some cash, is often a tax write-off. Of course, not every charitable gift will give back to you. Donating to political causes and candidates, purchasing raffle tickets for a fundraiser and in-kind donations of your talent and expertise are not tax deductible.

So when you make your list this Christmas, check it twice. Once to make sure you bought all the gifts for your family, and again to make sure you’ve set yourself up for every tax break tyou can get. After all, it is the giving season.

Photo: Oxclock