Identity Safety And Staying Secure With Wearable Devices

The increasingly connected world brings new conveniences that greatly benefit our everyday lives. No new connected device seems more ubiquitous than wearable devices – nearly 33 million were in use in the U.S. in 2015 by an estimated 20 million people. Smartwatches like Pebble and Apple watch allow us to access the internet with a flick of a wrist. Wearable health tech like the Fitbit and the gadget-class favorite Jawbone help improve the livelihoods of millions.

As much as wearables bring value to our lives, they also create a new opportunity for criminals to extract personally identifiable information. Like many other new technologies, security vulnerabilities in wearables are being exposed and potentially exploited.

The more information that’s collected, the easier it is to identify account numbers and passwords as well as medical ID numbers and tax return data. Better understanding the individual’s routines and habits ensures that criminal activity will go unnoticed for longer periods of time.

But some wearable data can provide quicker wins for identity thieves:

Most wearable devices use an accelerometer and gyroscope to track forward motion and directional orientation. Some even contain an altimeter to measure altitude for hikers and climbers. All of this data is crunched into code that orients the user’s specific location and tracks their activity – sometimes down to a few inches. Shockingly, new research found that ATM PIN codes could be discerned from the data in wearables’ sensors with 80% accuracy on one try and 90% accuracy after three tries.

A flash survey conducted by corporate identity management firm Centrify exposed some worrying trends:

  • 69% of wearable device owners don’t utilize login credentials such as passwords, fingerprint scans, or voice recognition to access their device, and
  • 56% of wearable owners use their device to access corporate applications such as Outlook, Dropbox, and Salesforce.
  • While the sample size was small, the survey was conducted at the RSA Conference, one of the world’s largest gatherings of information security professionals. If those on the frontline of data security leave their personal and corporate data at risk, it’s easy to imagine that the population at large may be even less cautious – jeopardizing their identities and your corporate data security.

Staying Secure With Wearable Devices

While wearables (and all technology, for that matter) are never 100% secure, there are a number of tactics that can be undertaken to minimize the risk of data theft:

  • Opt-out of automatic data transmission that will continually upload information via Wi-Fi or other networks.
  • When using a Wi-Fi, stick to known and/or secure networks.
  • Enable passwords and change them regularly. If available, use two-step authentication.
  • Physically secure the device if it’s not in use. Particularly, when traveling, utilize hotel safes.
  • Take time to learn how to remotely erase data so that the device can be “cleaned” if it’s lost or stolen.
  • Make sure to regularly update the operating system in order to patch known security gaps.

Looking for ways to minimize your risk of identity theft? Maintain a peace of mind while using your wearable device by enrolling in Optima’s ID Protection Plan at optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.

Spring Cleaning For a Secure Identity

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Spring is in full swing with its longer and sunnier days, and for many people, it is time for the annual spring cleaning to disentangle their homes from the build-up of wintertime clutter. However, much of that “clutter” can be pure gold for an identity thief. Junk mail such as credit card offers and unsolicited loan pre-approvals are chock full of valuable information about finances and lifestyle. Virtual clutter is also a target – unsecured and unorganized computer and smart phone data can be mined.

Minimize identity theft risk this spring with these easy tips:

  • Paperwork. Decide which documents need to be saved and then file them in a secure location. Unwanted items that contain personal information should be shredded, including receipts, bank and credit card statements, credit card offers, medical records, and health insurance statements.
  • Computers. Organize personal information and documents into password-protected folders. When deleting old or unneeded files, make sure to regularly empty the computer’s recycle bin. Ensure that all anti-virus software is up-to-date and run a full scan to ensure that the computer is free of viruses and malicious software.
  • Smartphone. Enable the phone’s password-protection features and only use secure networks, especially when using online banking or other apps that transmit sensitive information. When upgrading to a new device, wipe the old phone’s memory and restore to factory settings.
  • Wallet and Purses. Shred old receipts and outdated credit cards. Remove everything that isn’t necessary on a day-to-day basis – especially a Social Security card.

This spring, you can make sure you’re keeping your identity as clean and secure as possible by enrolling in Optima’s ID Protection Plan at optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.

 

Optima’s 2017 Annual Food Drive for Second Harvest Food Bank of OC

Cheers to the completion of another successful food drive supporting the Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County! Our staff set an all-time record by donating 3,500 pounds of food and household supplies, beating the previous record of 2,000 pounds set by our staff last year.

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The wonderful people at Second Harvest informed us that our donation will provide for over 2,800 meals! We’re truly honored to be able to partner with Second Harvest to make this food drive an annual tradition and an important part of our culture at Optima.

Of course, our donation is just a drop in the bucket when compared to the enormity of Second Harvest’s mission. In Orange County alone, Second Harvest serves over 300,000 people, a third of which are children, who struggle with food insecurity. To learn more about their amazing organization and how you can help support them in their fight to end hunger here in Orange County, visit Second Harvest’s website at feedoc.org and be sure to “like” them on Facebook at facebook.com/SecondHarvestFoodBankOC/. There you’ll see the vital programs they run, such as the Kids Café Program, the School Pantry Program, the Senior Grocery Program and much more.

And if you live outside Orange County and want to support the local food banks near you, simply visit feedingamerica.org. There you can look up the non-profits and food banks that are doing this important work in your community. Together we can end hunger!

Tax Season Is Here…And So Are The Scammers

The start of each new year typically brings renewed resolve to get healthy, strengthened desires for personal improvement, and of course, tax season.

Tax season can mean different things to a lot of people. Some look forward to a large refund; for others, it’s one more thing to tack onto their to-do list. For the scammers out there, it means the annual opportunity to rake in fraudulent refunds has finally arrived. Tax scammers are ruthless. They’re unaffected by the thought of families and individuals dependent upon what is likely their biggest check of the year being denied this financial relief.

If there’s one thing we can be sure of, it’s that there will be scams this tax season. Fortunately, there are safeguards you can take to stay protected this tax season.

  • Schedule time with your tax preparer now so you can get your taxes done as early as possible. This will help decrease the chances that a fraudster will get your refund before you do.
  • Sign up for Scam Alerts from the FTC to stay abreast of all the dirty tricks scammers are currently using.
  • Talk to someone in your HR department to see if you can get your W-2 before it’s mailed out. This will help ensure that you actually receive it so you don’t have to risk it being lost or stolen in the mail.
  • Never send emails with personally identifiable information (PII) attached. It’s best to never send them through email at all, but if you must, you should encrypt your message by making a change in your email’s security settings.
  • Beware of computer scams. These can come via email or as popups on your computer asking for your personal information. The IRS saw an approximate 400% surge in phishing and malware incidents in the 2016 tax season.
  • Always use a professional, trustworthy tax preparer. Sometimes, even national tax preparation chains can scam you out of your money or use less-than-secure procedures when it comes to handling your personal information. Make sure you use someone you trust.
  • Never provide any personal information over the phone to someone who says they are from the IRS. The IRS will never contact you via phone, email or social media.

Tax season is stress enough as it is; worrying about tax fraud shouldn’t have to be a part of it. Maintain a peace of mind by filing taxes as early as possible and by enrolling in an Optima Protection Plan at optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.

New Year, New You: Invest in Your Identity Wellness

The holiday season is now a thing of the past and now, New Year’s resolutions are the hot topic of conversation. The ultra-motivated will have a ten-part list covering everything from weight loss goals to finding a new hobby. And then there will of course be some outliers (16% of us according to a Neilson sruvey) that will admit that resolutions just aren’t for them. Wherever your ambitions lie on the spectrum, the one area of your life that can’t afford to be brushed off is your identity wellness.

Though often overlooked, your identity wellness deserves the kind of attention that people tend to put towards their health at the start of each new year. Your identity wellness encompasses everything from your financial security, credit profile, and credit score to digital privacy.

The New Year is the perfect time to make proactive identity protection a part of your everyday life. With these tips, you’ll be on your way to a smarter, safer, and more identity-secure you:

  • Check your bank and credit accounts frequently. It’s best to catch fraud as early as possible so that you can take action immediately; this minimizes damage and makes the resolution process easier.
  • Check your credit report regularly. Federal law requires the three major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) to provide you with a free credit report once a year. You can stagger these free reports every four months from each bureau so that you’re seeing your report pretty often. This is why credit monitoring services are so valuable: alerts are sent at the first sign of suspicious activity on your credit profile.
  • Stop connecting to public Wi-Fi. It’s convenient, of course, but frequently it’s unsecure. This means that any information you input while connected could be accessible by someone else. So if you must, just be sure to never access your financial accounts or any other sites that require a password when using public Wi-Fi.
  • Don’t click the “Remember Me” box on your digital accounts. If your computer, laptop, or smartphone ever got into the wrong hands, the perpetrator could have a field day accessing your accounts and gathering important personal information. Even worse, they could log into your bank or credit accounts.
  • Keep your firewall and anti-malware up to date. Firewalls block unauthorized access to your computer’s information, while anti-malware prevents malicious software from being downloaded to it. You must be sure to keep them up to date though, as hackers are constantly creating new ways to infiltrate your computer.
  • Update your passwords or look into a password manager. We all know by now that we should change our passwords often with strong, secure ones. Let’s face it though: most of us don’t. An easier solution might be to keep all of them together in a password manager so that you can use complex ones – without forgetting!
  • Shred your documents before tossing them. This includes your credit card/bank statements, pre-approved credit card offers, utility bills, and anything else that contains your personal information.

Of course nothing beats having a comprehensive identity protection provider that is there 24/7 for when the unexpected happens. Services like credit and identity monitoring send alerts if any suspicious activity is found so that you can take action immediately. To find out how you can protect your identity with Optima’s Protection Plans, visit optimatax.idprotectiononline.com.